Guy Lubitsh

BSc (Hons), MSc, MA, C.Psychol, D.Occ.Psych

Guy Lubitsh is a member of faculty at Ashridge. He is a highly experienced Chartered Organisational Psychologist, leadership developer, facilitator, executive coach. He has over 15 years' experience as an organisation consultant working in a range of sectors including healthcare, energy, media, and telecommunications.

Guy has expertise in organisational consulting, management and leadership development, talent management, employee engagement and developing individual, group and organisational change competence. His clients include the UK National Health Service, the World Health Organisation, Novo Nordisk, BSkyB, and Haniel Group.

Guy’s interests include talent management, the turn-around of underperforming organisations, and conflict resolution. He has published articles in the areas of organisational consulting and the role of emotions at work and writes regularly for the Guardian healthcare column.

Guy is also an Ashridge accredited coach.

Guy Lubitsh

Publications

NHS Leaders show courage under fire

Davda, A. & Lubitsh, G. (2014) 'NHS Leaders show courage under fire', Health Service Journal, April 2014.

Leadership in healthcare: meeting the challenge through enhancing resilience

Lubitsh, G. and Armstrong, A. (2014) 'Leadership in healthcare: meeting the challenge through enhancing resilience', conference presentation at the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Annual Primary Care Conference. Liverpool, 3 October

Talent Management: Maximising talent for business performance

Lubitsch, G. & Smith, I. (2010) Talent Management: Maximising talent for business performance, in Earley, P. & Jones, J. (eds) Accelerated Leadership Development: Fast-tracking school leaders, Institute of Education, ISBN 978 085473 8847, September

Talent Management - A Strategic Imperative

Lubitsch, G., Devine, M., Orbea, A. and Glanfield, P. (2007) Talent Management - A Strategic Imperative, Ashridge Consulting Report

Courage in the face of Extraordinary Talent

Powell, M. & Lubitsh, G. (2007) Courage in the face of Extraordinary Talent, Strategic HR Review, Vol. 6, Issue 5, pp. 24 - 27

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Talent management: a strategic imperative - 2007

Following research and identification of talent management practices in leading organisations, Guy Lubitsh and Ina Smith share thirteen dimensions of talent management. These offer organisations a framework for recognising the strategic choices they have made and reviewing whether their talent management systems will contribute to competitive advantage in the future.

Lubitsh, G. & Smith, I. (2007) Talent management: a strategic imperative, The Economist Intelligence Unit Executive Briefing Site,

Talent management: a strategic imperative

Following research and identification of talent management practices in leading organisations, Guy Lubitsh and Ina Smith share thirteen dimensions of talent management. These offer organisations a framework for recognising the strategic choices they have made and reviewing whether their talent management systems will contribute to competitive advantage in the future.

Lubitsh, G. & Smith, I. (2007) Talent management: a strategic imperative, 360° The Ashridge Journal, Spring, pp. 6 - 11

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The Impact of Theory of Constraints (TOC) in an NHS Trust

This study investigated the impact of theory of constraints (TOC), a change methodology previously employed in the private sector and now adapted to the health sector, on three NHS Trust departments, Neurosurgery, Eyes and ENT, especially in relation to reducing waiting lists in the system and improving throughput of patients. Data was collected over a period of 40 months, on a number of NHS performance indicators, before and after the TOC intervention. An interrupted time series design with switching replications was used to investigate the impact of the intervention. An overall ARIMA analysis indicated that TOC had an impact in both Eyes and ENT. Out of 18 measures, 16 went in the direction of the hypotheses - the probability of these changes in the predicted direction by chance alone was 0.0006. However, there was a lack of significant improvements in neurosurgery that was associated with the size of the system, complexity of treating neurological disorder, heavy reliance on support services, impact of emergencies on elective work and the motivation and receptiveness of staff to the proposed changes. Practical implications of this study showed that in order for organisations to maximise the benefits of TOC, organisations should take into account the social environment in which they exist. The importance of customising the intervention to the local needs of each department, and the requirements for leadership and robust project management are highlighted in this study. Failure to do so can potentially derail the change process.

Lubitsh, G., Doyle, C. & Valentine, J. (2005) The Impact of Theory of Constraints (TOC) in an NHS Trust, Journal of Management Development, Vol. 24, No. 2, pp 116-131.

The Learning Contract – A Behavioural Approach to Managing Poor Performance by Consultants and Preventing Disciplinary Action

Lubitsh, G. (2004) The Learning Contract – A Behavioural Approach to Managing Poor Performance by Consultants and Preventing Disciplinary Action, Clinician in Management , Vol. 12, No. 4.

Nurturing Small Miracles

This is an account of the work done by Ashridge Consulting's Guy Lubitsh with Winnicott Baby Unit, a neonatal intensive care unit. This involved the commencement of a change process that is transforming lives and work in a critical, emotionally charged environment within the NHS.

Lubitsh, G. (2003) Nurturing Small Miracles, a case study, Converse, pp.14-15, July.

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Bottom Line Consulting

Gary Luck and Guy Lubitsh argue that the era in which consultants were generously rewarded while the results of their work were not analysed is over. Now consultants have to deliver measurable results. Blue sky consulting has been reincarnated as bottom line consulting.

Luck, G. & Lubitsh, G. (2002) Bottom Line Consulting, Directions - The Ashridge Journal, Summer, pp 10-13.

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Thinking from the Heart

Lubitsh, G. & Higgins, J. (2001) Thinking from the Heart, Directions - The Ashridge Journal

A Longitudinal Study of the Impact of Theory of Constraints (TOC) on Productivity and Morale in the National Health Service (NHS)

Lubitsh, G. & Doyle, C.(2001) A Longitudinal Study of the Impact of Theory of Constraints (TOC) on Productivity and Morale in the National Health Service (NHS), Poster presentation at the 7th European Work and Psychology Conference, Barbican Centre

Stress, distress and air traffic incidents: Jobdysfunction and distress in airline pilots in relation to contextually – assessed stress

Loewenthal, K., Eysenck, M., Harrris, D., Lubitsh, G. & Gorton, T. (2000) Stress, distress and air traffic incidents: Jobdysfunction and distress in airline pilots in relation to contextually – assessed stress, Stress Medicine, Vol 16

Comfort and Joy? Religion, cognition and mood in Protestants and Jews under Stress

This study examined cognitive aspects of coping with stress, how these related to religiosity, and how they related to outcomes (positive mood and distress). Participants (n=126) were of Protestant or Jewish background, and had all experienced recent major stress. They were assessed on measures of religiosity, religious coping, perception of the consequences of the stressful event, attributions for its occurrence, and distress, intrusive unpleasant thoughts, and positive affect. Religiosity affected ways of thinking about the stressful situation, namely: Belief that G-d is enabling the individual to bear their troubles (religious/spiritual support), belief that it was all for the best, and (more weakly) belief that all is ultimately controlled by G-d. Religiosity affected neither the proportion of positive consequences perceived as outcomes of the event, nor the causal attributions examined. Religious background (Protestant vs. Jewish) had negligible effects on the cognitions measures. Causal pathway analysis suggested that religion-related cognitions might directly affect positive affect, but not distress. Problems of design and interpretation are discussed. The study suggests some cognitively mediated means by which religion may have comforting effects.

Loewenthal, K., MackLeod, A.K., Goldblatt, V., Lubitsh, G. & Valentine, J.D. (2000) Comfort and Joy? Religion, cognition and mood in Protestants and Jews under Stress, Cognition & Emotion, Vol. 14 (3)

Haredi Women, Haredi Men, Stress and Distress

Loewenthal, K. Goldblatt, V. Lubitsh, G. (1998) Haredi Women, Haredi Men, Stress and Distress, Israel Journal of Psychiatry, Vol 35, No. 3

The Social Circumstances of Anxiety and Its Symptoms Among Anglo – Jews

Loewenthal, K., Goldblatt, V., Lubitsh, G., Gorton, T., Bicknell, H., Fellows, D. & Sowden, A. (1997) The Social Circumstances of Anxiety and Its Symptoms Among Anglo – Jews, Journal of Affective Disorders

The Costs and Benefits of Boundary Maintenance: Stress, Religion and Culture Among Jews in Britain

Loewenthal, K., Goldblatt, V., Lubitsh, G., Gorton, T., Bicknell, H., Fellows, D. & Sowden, A. (1997) The Costs and Benefits of Boundary Maintenance: Stress, Religion and Culture Among Jews in Britain, Social Psychiatry Vol. 32

Gender and Depression in Anglo – Jewry

Loewenthal, K., Goldblatt, V., Gorton, T., Lubitsh, G., Bicknell, H., Fellows, D. & Sowden, A. (1995) Gender and Depression in Anglo – Jewry, Psychological Medicine, Vol 25